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Joseph's Blog

Category Archives: Client Experience Keynote

{Infographic} Choosing Where to Invest in Customer Experience Innovation

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Choosing Where to Invest In Customer Experience Innovation: The Art of Tradeoffs

Tweet When asked if customers would like to have more exciting products, faster delivery, lower prices, OR friendlier service, the answer is always YES. The challenge of customer experience excellence isn’t whether to improve products, people, process, or technology. The challenge is to identify which product, process or technology improvement will produce the greatest benefits […]

{Infographic} What Are Your UICs?

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A Contrarian View on the United Airlines Customer Nightmare (We all have a role to play)

Tweet I was going to write a blog about all the missteps involved in the United Airlines customer experience disaster. Then I started seeing an “abundance of critics” rushing out of the woodworks – some of whom clearly have never tried to help a company strike a balance between customer needs and profitability. With all […]

{Guest Post} Emotional Analysis Of Customer Feedback: The Missing Link

Tweet According to Bruce Temkin’s 2016 study, after a positive emotional experience, customers are 15 times more likely to recommend a company. 15 times more likely! That’s a huge difference. Not surprisingly, emotion analysis is receiving a lot of buzz. But do the current solutions deliver on the key question that companies should be asking themselves: […]

{Infographic} All Business is Personal – Consistency with a Twist

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{Infographic} It’s Viral, It’s Video Storytelling – Live Visuals Rule

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{Infographic} The Future of Customer Service: Artificial Intelligence vs Human Intelligence

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The Future of Customer Service: Human Intelligence (HI) or Artificial Intelligence (AI)

Tweet I have been slow to accept that, from a service perspective, humans will ever be replaced by computers.  I’ve suggested that customers will resist “robots” and I’ve based my thinking in part on the “uncanny valley” hypothesis which postulates that the more robots look like humans the less humans will feel comfortable with them. […]